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Join OWLA Today!

For those of you concerned with the health and preservation of Owasco Lake, please download the attached form and send it to OWLA.  By becoming an OWLA member, you may also join one of the following committees:

  • Membership
  • Education/Communications
  • Agriculture
  • Public Relations/Special Events
  • Land Use/Zoning
  • Environmental/Conservation/Water Testing
  • Owasco Flats
  • Corporate

Download the membership form below.

Attachments:
Download this file (New membership form D.pdf)OWLA New Membership Form[ ]15 Kb
 
Ithaca College’s Finger Lakes Environmental Film Festival
(03/18/10) Ithaca College ’s Finger Lakes Environmental Film Festival
(FLEFF) will join Cinemapolis in presenting the world premiere of “*Living Downstream*.” Directed by Canadian filmmaker Chanda Chevannes, the film documents ecologist Sandra Steingraber’s private struggle with cancer and her public fight to bring attention to the urgent human rights issue of cancer prevention. Based on Steingraber’s book of the same name, the film will be screened on Saturday, April 3, at 7 p.m. at Cinemapolis, 120 E. Green St. , in Ithaca . Steingraber and Chevannes will introduce the film and conduct a discussion after the screening.
Steingraber will also sign copies of her book, which will be sold at the event by Buffalo Street Books.
The first 50 people to show up will be admitted free. After that, general admission will be $9; tickets for seniors (64 and older) and children (12 and under) will be $7.50.
Told from Steingraber’s unique perspective as a biologist, ecologist and poet, “*Living Downstream*” is the personal story of a bladder cancer survivor as well as a scientific inquiry into two toxic chemicals—atrazine and PCBs—and their possible health effects.
“In the film we follow these invisible toxins as they migrate to some of the most beautiful places in North America ,” Chevannes said. “We see how these chemicals enter our bodies and how, once inside, scientists believe they may be working to cause cancer. ‘*Living Downstream*’ is a powerful reminder of the intimate connection between the health of our bodies and the health of our environment.”
Steingraber holds a doctorate in biology from the University of Michigan and a master’s in English from Illinois State University . A Scholar in Residence in Ithaca College’s Division of Interdisciplinary and International Studies since 2003, Steingraber was a featured expert in the Bill Moyers PBS documentary “Kids and Chemicals: Are We Poisoning Our Children?” In addition to “Living Downstream,” she has authored “Having Faith: An Ecologist’s Journey to Motherhood,” “The Spoils of Famine,” and a volume of poetry, “Post-Diagnosis.” The second edition of “Living Downstream,” which is updated with the latest scientific evidence, will be available from Da Capo Press in April.
In addition to directing “Living Downstream,” Chevannes, along with Nathan Shields, both of The People’s Picture Company in Toronto , produced the film. The Ithaca premiere will be followed by a series of North American screenings scheduled to take place in the coming months.
For more information on these upcoming events, visit www.livingdownstream.com <http://www.livingdownstream.com>
Beginning in September, the film will be available on DVD for educational and community use. For ordering information, visit www.livingdownstream.com/order_the_dvd.php
Launched in 1997, the Finger Lakes Environmental Film Festival was an outreach project from the Center for the Environment at Cornell University . In 2005 the festival moved permanently to Ithaca College , where it is housed in the Division of Interdisciplinary and International Studies as a program to link intellectual inquiry and debate to larger global issues.

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(03/18/10) Ithaca College ’s Finger Lakes Environmental Film Festival(FLEFF) will join Cinemapolis in presenting the world premiere of “*Living Downstream*.” Directed by Canadian filmmaker Chanda Chevannes, the film documents ecologist Sandra Steingraber’s private struggle with cancer and her public fight to bring attention to the urgent human rights issue of cancer prevention. Based on Steingraber’s book of the same name, the film will be screened on Saturday, April 3, at 7 p.m. at Cinemapolis, 120 E. Green St. , in Ithaca . Steingraber and Chevannes will introduce the film and conduct a discussion after the screening. Steingraber will also sign copies of her book, which will be sold at the event by Buffalo Street Books.
The first 50 people to show up will be admitted free. After that, general admission will be $9; tickets for seniors (64 and older) and children (12 and under) will be $7.50.
Told from Steingraber’s unique perspective as a biologist, ecologist and poet, “*Living Downstream*” is the personal story of a bladder cancer survivor as well as a scientific inquiry into two toxic chemicals—atrazine and PCBs—and their possible health effects.
“In the film we follow these invisible toxins as they migrate to some of the most beautiful places in North America ,” Chevannes said. “We see how these chemicals enter our bodies and how, once inside, scientists believe they may be working to cause cancer. ‘*Living Downstream*’ is a powerful reminder of the intimate connection between the health of our bodies and the health of our environment.”
Steingraber holds a doctorate in biology from the University of Michigan and a master’s in English from Illinois State University . A Scholar in Residence in Ithaca College’s Division of Interdisciplinary and International Studies since 2003, Steingraber was a featured expert in the Bill Moyers PBS documentary “Kids and Chemicals: Are We Poisoning Our Children?” In addition to “Living Downstream,” she has authored “Having Faith: An Ecologist’s Journey to Motherhood,” “The Spoils of Famine,” and a volume of poetry, “Post-Diagnosis.” The second edition of “Living Downstream,” which is updated with the latest scientific evidence, will be available from Da Capo Press in April.
In addition to directing “Living Downstream,” Chevannes, along with Nathan Shields, both of The People’s Picture Company in Toronto , produced the film. The Ithaca premiere will be followed by a series of North American screenings scheduled to take place in the coming months. For more information on these upcoming events, visit www.livingdownstream.com <http://www.livingdownstream.com>
Beginning in September, the film will be available on DVD for educational and community use. For ordering information, visit www.livingdownstream.com/order_the_dvd.php<http://www.livingdownstream.com/order_the_dvd.php>
Launched in 1997, the Finger Lakes Environmental Film Festival was an outreach project from the Center for the Environment at Cornell University . In 2005 the festival moved permanently to Ithaca College , where it is housed in the Division of Interdisciplinary and International Studies as a program to link intellectual inquiry and debate to larger global issues.

 
Find Us On Facebook

The Owasco Watershed Network has recently joined Facebook.  Hopefully this will expand our audience and user base.  If you haven't already joined OWN, sign up today and contribute articles and opinions.

 

Find us and friend us at:  http://www.facebook.com/OwascoWatershedNetwork

 
NYS DOS Finger Lakes Projects

Finger Lakes Region

Read more at:  http://www.nyswaterfronts.com/initiatives_fingerlakes.asp

The Finger Lakes region of central New York is characterized by a dozen lakes whose watersheds include a variety of valuable natural resources, including water, fish and wildlife habitat, wetlands, and forest. The lakes and their watersheds are used extensively for agriculture, recreation, and tourism, highlighting the link between resource protection and the regional economy.

To better guide efforts aimed at protecting and improving the water quality in the Finger Lakes, the Division of Coastal Resources has encouraged communities to develop a planning process that is focused on watersheds and not political boundaries.

Attention has centered on Cayuga Lake, Conesus Lake and Canandaigua Lake. Although various plans had been completed over the years for these lakes, these tended to be dated and lacked the direct involvement of the local governments. This regional initiative has completed and is now implementing three watershed plans. The plans and their implementation is being overseen by a partnership comprised of the local governments within each watershed, state agencies, and advocacy organizations involved in lake protection. Existing planning entities, such as a regional planning board or county planning department, are providing technical support.

Citation:  NYS Department of State 2004/ NYS DOS Division of Coastal Resources, Coastal Resources Online/ Website/  http://www.nyswaterfronts.com/initiatives_fingerlakes.asp/ March 12, 2010

 

 
Responsible Landscaping For Homeowners

Can We Make A Difference?

Can individual homeowners do their part to improve water quality?  The answer is YES!  There are several things that we can do around our houses to improve water quality.  The way that we manage our lawns, driveways, and ditches has a huge impact on the condition of the water as it leaves our property.  We can also affect water quality by carefully selecting and using pesticides and fertilizers.

Would you believe that during a half inch rainfall event, a one acre lawn collects about 13,600 gallons of water?  Depending on the time of year, much of that water may be absorbed by your lawn, but what happens to the rest of the water, and what happens when the lawn is either frozen or already saturated with water?  The water that is not absorbed by our lawns is called runoff, and depending on where it flows and what it flows through, it can have a devastating impact on downstream ecology and ultimately, the health of Owasco Lake.  The key to properly managing runoff is to slow down the water to give the soil, nutrients, and chemicals that the water may be carrying a chance to fall out of suspension.  Soil, nutrients, and chemicals are known to cause degradation of water quality and consequently, damage to our ecosystems.

GreenScaping

The term ‘GreenScaping’ is used to describe environmentally conscious landscaping.  Responsible lawn care includes but is not limited to using only organic fertilizers, or no fertilizers at all, minimizing herbicide and pesticide use, integrated pest management, composting yard waste, using drip irrigation, planting buffer strips to slow and filter lawn runoff, and capturing roof runoff for later use.

 

 
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